Blogs

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When Mihaela (not her real name) was six years old, her father sent her onto the streets to scavenge for food for the family and beg for money to fund his alcoholism treatment. “We were very poor,” she says. “I ...
The 51st session of the Commission on Population and Development (CPD 51) took place in New York just last week. Countdown 2030 Europe partners took part in the negotiations as members of various national delegations and advisors on the SRHR ...
The European Commission is currently preparing a proposal for its next multiannual budget, which will determine the EU’s annual spending from 2021 to 2027. This is a complex and highly political process, made even more so as the UK prepares ...
March 2nd marked the first anniversary of She Decides , a global movement gathering individuals, organizations and governments committed to building a “new normal” where women and girls everywhere can decide about their own bodies, lives and futures. Without question. ...
By Alison Spillane, Irish Family Planning Association. Ireland has taken important steps in recent years in the fight to end female genital mutilation (FGM). At the domestic level, the Criminal Justice (Female Genital Mutilation) Act was introduced in 2012 to ...
By Gina Wharton, Advocacy Advisor at IPPF European Network Civil Society Organisations must be seen as integral partners in decision-making processes was the resounding message at the Third Africa-EU Civil Society Organisation Forum, in Tunis, Tunisia (11-13 July 2017). I ...
By Fiona Coyle, Global and Sustainable Development Lead at the IPPF European Network Regional Office. On 11 July, over 700 people from around the world (leaders, Minister, advocates, policymakers, youth activists, and researchers) descended upon London for the 2nd Family ...
Natika Halil is Executive Director of FPA, the UK sexual health charity, IPPF EN Member Association On 30 June 2017 we saw a landmark decision for women’s rights, with the British government finally agreeing to rectify a historic injustice and ...
Seventy-three percent of women have experienced abuse online. Online abuse is a form of cyber violence. The U.N. defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts.” Cyber violence extends that definition to include acts like trolling, hacking, spamming, and harassment online. Internet and social media platforms allow people to hide behind anonymous usernames or twitter handles often causing the abuse to be even crueler than would be the case offline.
1 in 3. This is how many women have been subjected to violence in their lifetime. This is shocking, yet when you look at the pervasive sexism in our society, this figure isn’t so surprising. Sexism is the root of ...